Friday, September 05, 2014

The Benefits of Broccoli Sprouts



Medical science is finally understanding the power of sprouts and especially broccoli sprouts regarding the prevention and treatment of cancer. From universities, journals, and other organizations Broccoli sprout beverage enhance detoxification of air pollutants in clinical trials.

Date: June 16, 2014
Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Summary: A clinical trial involving nearly 300 Chinese men and women residing in one of China's most polluted regions found that daily consumption of a half cup of broccoli sprout beverage produced rapid, significant and sustained higher levels of excretion of benzene, a known human carcinogen, and acrolein, a lung irritant. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, working with colleagues at several U.S. and Chinese institutions, used the broccoli sprout beverage to provide sulforaphane, a plant compound already demonstrated to have cancer preventive properties in animal studies.

Air pollution, an increasing global problem, causes as many as seven million deaths a year worldwide, according to the World Health Organization, and has in recent years reached perilous levels in many parts of China. Last year, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified air pollution and particulate matter (PM) from air pollution as carcinogenic to humans. Diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, of which broccoli is one, have been found to reduce risk of chronic degenerative diseases, including cancer. Broccoli sprouts are a source of glucoraphanin, a compound that generates sulforaphane when the plant is chewed or the beverage swallowed. It acts to increase enzymes that enhance the body's capacity to expunge these types of the pollutants.


The 12-week trial included 291 participants who live in a rural farming community in Jiangsu Province, China, approximately 50 miles north of Shanghai, one of China's most heavily industrialized regions. Participants in the control group drank a beverage made of sterilized water, pineapple and lime juice while the beverage for the treatment group additionally contained a dissolved freeze-dried powder made from broccoli sprouts that contained glucoraphanin and sulforaphane.

The research team found that among participants receiving the broccoli sprout beverage, the rate of excretion of the carcinogen benzene increased 61% beginning the first day and continuing throughout the 12-week period. In addition, the rate of excretion of the irritant acrolein, rapidly and durably increased 23% during the 12-week trial. Secondary analyses by the investigators indicated that the sulforaphane may be exerting its protective actions by activating a signaling molecule, NRF2, that elevates the capacity of cells to adapt to and survive a broad range of environmental toxins. This strategy may also be effective for some contaminants in water and food. "This study points to a frugal, simple and safe means that can be taken by individuals to possibly reduce some of the long-term health risks associated with air pollution," notes Thomas Kensler, PhD, professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School and one of the study's co-authors. "This while government leaders and policy makers define and implement more effective regulatory policies to improve air quality."



The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Take the Healthy Body Challenge






Did you know Danny Glover and Youngevity teamed up to fight Diabetes and Obesity this past August 15th in Cloumbus, Georgia?

Youngevity International, Inc., a global direct marketer of nutritional and lifestyle products and also a vertically-integrated producer of gourmet coffees for the commercial, retail, and direct sales channels, has teamed up with actor/celebrity and health advocate Danny Glover, to help educate individuals on the benefits of proper nutrition, activity, and wellness principles as solutions to the growing health concerns of diabetes and obesity. Youngevity has been bringing the message of the valuable and beneficial role of nutrition, exercise and proper dietary supplementation in combating these types of growing health concerns for over 17 years.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of U.S. adults are obese and close to 10% of the population is diabetic. Even with all the information and resources available to educate individuals on the risks and preventative measures that can be taken, rates of both of these health issues have been significantly rising.

Who says Vitamins are no good?

This new study, linking low levels of Vitamin D to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, looked at the blood levels of Vitamin D in over 1,600 participants over a 5-6 year period. Participants were over the age of 65 and at the time did not have dementia, cardiovascular disease, or any history of stroke. When participants were brought back for a follow-up after 5 to 6 years, it was found that 171 participants had developed dementia and 102 participants had developed Alzheimer’s. What was established was that low levels of Vitamin D in the blood increased your risk of developing dementia by 53%, and those with severely low levels of Vitamin D, had a 125% risk of developing dementia. As for Alzheimer’s disease, low levels of Vitamin D in the blood increased your risk by 70%, and severely low levels of Vitamin D increased your risk by 120%.2

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Raw Kelp Noodles



Raw Asian Creamy Kelp Noodles
Serves 3 to 4

Ingredients: (use organic)

2 packages raw kelp noodles, 24 ounces
¼ cup water
1 Tablespoon miso paste
1½ Tablespoons sesame oil
1½ cups + 1/3 cup unroasted (raw) cashews, divided
½ teaspoon high-quality sea salt
1 cup chopped scallions, white part only
1¼ cups diced tomato
1¼ cups sliced red cabbage
Fresh cilantro, for garnish
1 lime, quartered, for garnish

Directions:

Rinse the kelp noodles well in a colander. Place in a large mixing bowl and set aside. In a blender, process the water, miso paste, sesame oil, 1½ cups of the raw cashews, and sea salt until thoroughly combined. Pour over the kelp noodles and mix well. This is best done with clean hands, which helps to evenly saturate the noodles with the sauce. Add the raw veggies. Mix well again with your hands, and divide equally among 4 plates. Grind the last 1/3 cup of cashews in a food processor. Garnish each dish with a sprig of cilantro, a sprinkling of ground cashews and a quarter of a lime. Serve at room temperature or warm very gently in a pot.

Recipe courtesy of Kimberly Snyder, C.N., author of The Beauty Detox Foods